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About Smart Flight Training

Safety.  Competence.  Confidence.  In that order.

Certified Flight Instructor Andrew Hartley with his youngest "students!"

Certified Flight Instructor Andrew Hartley with his youngest "students!"

Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor who has been involved in the aviation industry for over 18 years.  He has worked in airline, airport, corporate, fractional, and private aviation operations since 1997, and has never once lost his passion for, or interest in, the aviation industry. Learn more about Andrew by clicking here.

Smart Flight Training was founded on the idea that as technologies change, so must flight training.  Pilot training at even some of the largest facilities and universities in the world is still a game of books, classrooms, and face-to-face teaching.  Certainly learning to physically fly an airplane requires one-on-one time with an instructor, but learning the required knowledge to safely, competently, and confidently apply to your flying does not have to be so - well - let's just say "20th-century."

Today, you can learn on your own time, from wherever you are, online.  You may still choose to carry a physical book with you (I often do), but whether you have a laptop, a tablet, a smartphone, or even simply access to the internet at a cafe or library, nothing should stop you from using what time you have available to continue your learning towards whatever level of pilot you want to become. Whether that be a "hobbiest" or a "professional."

At Smart Flight Training, you'll find the information you need, in bite-sized chunks that can be learned while you are commuting (listen to the podcast if you're driving - read the blog or a lesson from Smart Flight School if you are on the bus or subway) or even waiting in line somewhere.

We also offer a free email newsletter that contains tips to make your flying safer and more fun!  Everyone who flies with you - be they paying passengers or family and friends - puts their trust in you to keep them safe and confortable.  Don't let them down!

 

Testing Tuesday: Instrument Interpretation (HSI)

Oh, the HSI.

This instrument, also known as the Horizontal Situation Indicator, is a nightmare if you haven't actually used it. From what I have heard, once you have used one and understand it, they are fantastic. I've talked to pilots who say they won't even fly an airplane that doesn't have one.

In the answer explanation we'll get into some tricks on answering the questions related to the HSI, but also some tricks on how to visualize the HSI and unserstand better what it is telling you - so that you don't need the "answering the question" tricks because you actually understand what the instrument is telling you!

Once again this week we have a question that I missed while studying for my FAA Instrument Rating knowledge test. And here it is:

(Refer to Figures 98 and 99, below) To which aircraft position does HSI presentation "B" correspond?

  1. 9
  2. 13
  3. 19

FAA Instrument Knowledge Test Figure 98

FAA Instrument Knowledge Test Figure 99




Click here to display the answer...

So there you have it! I hope this post has shed a little light on the mysterious HSI - I know I understand them better after trying to explain them here. Hopefully I won't miss this question the next time I see it on an FAA knowledge test!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio.

Testing Tuesday is a regular installment, each Tuesday, on the Smart Flight Training Blog. I post these in the hopes that they will help you be more prepared the next time you meet with your flight instructor, since preparation will save you both time and money during your flight training. I also post these because - I'll be honest - it is helping me prepare for the CFII certificate, which I am currently working toward. Two birds, one stone, right?

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Testing Tuesday: Class C Airspace Requirements

FAA Airspace

It's Tuesday again, and that means another installment of Testing Tuesday at Smart Flight Training!

I hope these question and answer sessions are helpful for you, but I'll be honest: I'm doing these for myself, too. I needed to continue to work on my CFII (Certificated Flight Instructor - Instrument) knowledge, and this seems as good a place as any to make sure my knowledge is strong as I move closer to that goal that, I'll admit, I've already missed the deadline I set for myself.

With that said, let's get on to today's question:

What minimum aircraft equipment is required for operation within class C airspace?

  1. Two way communications and Mode C transponder
  2. Two way communications
  3. Transponder and DME




Click here to display the answer...

Well, hopefully this Testing Tuesday post was helpful. This was a question I myself missed when I was originally studying for my Instrument Rating knowledge test, so it was good to review this and make sure I don't miss it again and can teach it to my future instrument students accurately and well.

Please let us know what you think about our Testing Tuesdays, and let us know if you have a question you would like answered - maybe something you missed on your own knowledge tests along the way, or something you were asked during the oral portion of a checkride. Let's make this more social, more interactive, more interesting! Try to stump me, try to stump the rest of my readers! You shouldn't have much trouble stumping me, but my readers are smart, so that will not be an easy task!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, OH.

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Testing Tuesday: Wake Turbulence

It's #TestingTuesday - prepare yourself and learn to fly smarter!

Wing Vortices

What wind condition prolongs the hazards of wake turbulence on a landing runway for the longest period of time?

  1. Direct headwind.
  2. Direct tailwind.
  3. Light quartering tailwind.




Click here to display the answer...


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio.

ABOUT TESTING TUESDAY: Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot might expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training is PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question – click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

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Testing Tuesday: Weather – Lenticular Clouds

Welcome again to #TestingTuesday! Learn to fly smarter by being prepared for your lesson - your instructor (and your wallet) will thank you!

The presence of standing lenticular altocumulus clouds is a good indication of

  1. a jetstream.
  2. very strong turbulence.
  3. heavy icing conditions.



Click here to display the answer...


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, OH. He makes seven figures but the first two are zero.

ABOUT TESTING TUESDAY: Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot should expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training is PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday posts will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question – click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

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