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Testing Tuesday: IFR Lost Communication Procedures

Scary Headset

Losing communication capabilities is nerve-wracking in VFR conditions, but is relatively straight-forward if you can see where you are going, even if where you are going is controlled airspace - though under VFR you can very easily go to a non-towered airport without talking to anyone and no one would really even know the difference (you might annoy other pilots in the pattern, but you would be perfectly legal). Towered airports can still communicate with you via light signal - you do have those light signals memorized for the checkride right? And if you are post-checkride, you have a cheatsheet on your kneeboard or pasted to your instrument panel, correct?

That said, under IFR, lost communication is a situation that might require a change of underwear upon reaching your destination - how the heck are you supposed to know what you are expected to do if air traffic control can't give you vectors and altitudes?

This Testing Tuesday, we have a question that you will definitely hear on your IFR checkride's oral exam:

What are you expected to do on an instrument flight when two-way communications has been lost?




Click here to display the answer...


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio.

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Testing Tuesday: Class C Airspace Requirements

FAA Airspace

It's Tuesday again, and that means another installment of Testing Tuesday at Smart Flight Training!

I hope these question and answer sessions are helpful for you, but I'll be honest: I'm doing these for myself, too. I needed to continue to work on my CFII (Certificated Flight Instructor - Instrument) knowledge, and this seems as good a place as any to make sure my knowledge is strong as I move closer to that goal that, I'll admit, I've already missed the deadline I set for myself.

With that said, let's get on to today's question:

What minimum aircraft equipment is required for operation within class C airspace?

  1. Two way communications and Mode C transponder
  2. Two way communications
  3. Transponder and DME




Click here to display the answer...

Well, hopefully this Testing Tuesday post was helpful. This was a question I myself missed when I was originally studying for my Instrument Rating knowledge test, so it was good to review this and make sure I don't miss it again and can teach it to my future instrument students accurately and well.

Please let us know what you think about our Testing Tuesdays, and let us know if you have a question you would like answered - maybe something you missed on your own knowledge tests along the way, or something you were asked during the oral portion of a checkride. Let's make this more social, more interactive, more interesting! Try to stump me, try to stump the rest of my readers! You shouldn't have much trouble stumping me, but my readers are smart, so that will not be an easy task!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, OH.

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Testing Tuesday: Weather – Lenticular Clouds

Welcome again to #TestingTuesday! Learn to fly smarter by being prepared for your lesson - your instructor (and your wallet) will thank you!

The presence of standing lenticular altocumulus clouds is a good indication of

  1. a jetstream.
  2. very strong turbulence.
  3. heavy icing conditions.



Click here to display the answer...


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, OH. He makes seven figures but the first two are zero.

ABOUT TESTING TUESDAY: Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot should expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training is PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday posts will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question – click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

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Testing Tuesday: Airport Diagrams

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training: PREPARE! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question - click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

 

(See Airport Diagram below question) That portion of the runway identified by the letter A may be used for:

  1. Taxiing and takeoff
  2. Taxiing and landing
  3. Landing

 FAA Figure 49

Click Image to Enlarge - NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION

 


Click here to see the answer...

I hope this Testing Tuesday question was enlightening and helpful! If you have any questions or concerns about this answer (or have a question that you would like to see on an upcoming Testing Tuesday post), contact us and let us know!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio. He would be more inclined to grow up if he saw that it worked out for everyone else.

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Why Flight Training should be One of the Seven Deadly Sins

7 Deadly Sins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okay, maybe it shouldn't BE one, but is it just me, or do the stages of becoming a pilot track dangerously along with the seven deadly sins?

Stage 1:
Lust

You have decided to start working to learn to fly, and you now CANNOT WAIT for each flight lesson to come along - you get excited every time you see or hear an airplane, and you can't stop talking about flying with anyone who makes the mistake of asking you about it.

 

 

Stage 2:
Envy

When you are not at the airport flying, you wish you were, and you are jealous of others who get to fly when you are doing other things, like eating, sleeping, or breathing - anything while you are not in an airplane. You also feel a little jealous of those folks who started before you and already have soloed, or have already gotten their pilot's licenses. This also applies to the inevitable "need" for bigger better faster airplanes.

 

 

Stage 3:
Gluttony

This is related to Stage 1 - LUST, and stage 4 - GREED, in that you are now reading, thinking, researching, talking, and living aviation pretty much every moment of every day. You simply CANNOT get enough flying in your life.

 

 

 

Stage 4:
Greed

See Stage 3 - GLUTTONY. You have reserved every "learn to fly" book at your local library, bought every aviation magazine off the newsstand at the bookstore, and are hoarding them so that you can cross-reference, scan, take notes, and cut out pictures for your "dream board" of what airplanes you want to fly - AS SOON AS HUMANLY POSSIBLE.

 

 

Stage 5:
Sloth

This is a tough one, because you will be working harder than ever to gain the knowledge and learn the skills necessary to learn to fly. So while you will not actually be slothful, it may appear that you are slothful to your friends, family, and co-workers since the time you previously spent working around the house, going out, getting other things done, and showering is now committed to perfecting your knowledge of the regulations and armchair flying the maneuvers you need to perform to make your instructor happy and pass your checkride.

 

Stage 6:
Wrath

This one comes about when you are angry at yourself for forgetting something simple on your last flight. It may also come about when it is lightly suggested that you might spend less time flying and studying and more time taking care of your children and bathing. Remember that these suggestions are coming from people who care about you and want the best for you. Then remember that they (probably) will still love you and want the best for you AFTER your flight training is complete. Simmer down, now.

 

 

Stage 7:
Pride

You've now passed your checkride, and you want to show your certificate to everyone you meet - your family, friends, co-workers, people you went to high-school with, and random people on the street. You feel a little taller, talk a little louder, are a little more confident, and have more hair. You are also now irresistible to the opposite sex, because you are a PILOT (reference step 1 - Lust)

 


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor in Columbus, Ohio. He has never had (nor does he currently have) any of the above issues. Honestly.

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