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Archives for April 2014

Testing Tuesday: Special Use Airspace – MOAs

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training is PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question - click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

What action should a pilot take when operating under VFR in a Military Operations Area (MOA)?

  1. Obtain a clearance from the controlling agency prior to entering the MOA.
  2. Operate only on the airways that transverse the MOA.
  3. Exercise extreme caution when military activity is being conducted.




Click here to display the answer...

Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio. He scoffs at gravity.

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Testing Tuesday: IFR Fuel Requirements

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training: PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question – click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

IFR Approach

What are the minimum fuel requirements for airplanes in IFR conditions if the first airport of intended landing is forecast to have a 1,500-foot ceiling and 3 miles visibility at flight-planned ETA? Fuel to fly to the first airport of intended landing,

  1. and fly thereafter for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed.
  2. fly to the alternate, and fly thereafter for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed.
  3. fly to the alternate, and fly thereafter for 30 minutes at normal cruising speed.




Click here to display the answer...

I hope this Testing Tuesday question was helpful and thought-provoking, as usual! If you have any questions or concerns about this answer (or have a question that you would like to see on an upcoming Testing Tuesday post), contact us and let us know!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio. He wonders why his daughter's diaper holds nowhere near the 12-18 pounds it promises.

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Testing Tuesday: Traffic Avoidance

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training: PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question - click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

During a night flight, you observe a steady white light and a flashing red light ahead and at the same altitude. What is the general direction of movement of the other aircraft?

  1. The other aircraft is crossing from the right to the left.
  2. The other aircraft is flying away from you.
  3. The other aircraft is crossing from the left to the right.

Click here to display the answer...

As always, I hope this Testing Tuesday question was helpful and thought-provoking! If you have any questions or concerns about this answer (or have a question that you would like to see on an upcoming Testing Tuesday post), contact us and let us know!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio. He likes when google answers his stupid questions because it means he's not the only one asking google stupid questions.

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Testing Tuesday: Airport Diagrams

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training: PREPARE! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question - click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

 

(See Airport Diagram below question) That portion of the runway identified by the letter A may be used for:

  1. Taxiing and takeoff
  2. Taxiing and landing
  3. Landing

 FAA Figure 49

Click Image to Enlarge - NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION

 


Click here to see the answer...

I hope this Testing Tuesday question was enlightening and helpful! If you have any questions or concerns about this answer (or have a question that you would like to see on an upcoming Testing Tuesday post), contact us and let us know!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio. He would be more inclined to grow up if he saw that it worked out for everyone else.

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Learning to Fly vs. Learning to Drive

OHDL

I have a cousin (a cousin-in-law really) who has just gotten his learner's permit for his driver's license, and it got me thinking about the basic requirements to learn to drive and getting your driver's license vs. learning to fly, and getting your Private Pilot Certificate.

Let's take a look, shall we?

In the State of Ohio, to get a driver's license you must have:

  • 6 months under your belt with a learner's permit
  • 24 hours of classroom education
  • 8 hours of driving time with a certified instructor
  • 50 hours of general driving time with a licensed adult
    • at least 10 hours of nighttime driving

Let's compare these to the requirements to learn to fly (14 CFR Part 61 Subpart E):

  • Required Time Period: no required period of time as a "learner"
    • There are actually "accelerated" programs that promise you will have your Private License in as short a period as 10 days!
  • Required Classroom Time: none, specifically; you will do ground training with an instructor, or on your own (using an at-home course like Sporty's or King or the upcoming Smart Flight Training Academy), or in class, but there is no specific time requirement.
    • The regulations require that you "receive and log" ground training on certain topics, but there is no time required for the amount of time spent on these areas.
  • Required supervised flight time: 20 hours
    • You must log a minimum of 20 hours of flight time with a certificated flight instructor.
    • You must also log a minimum of 10 hours solo.
    • You must log a total of 40 hours minimum (solo or with instructor) to be eligible to receive your PPL.
  • Required Night Time: 3 hours

There are further, more granular requirements that are included within the times above, but in effect, you can see that they have actauly made learning to drive more time consuming than learning to fly (at least in the State of Ohio).

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