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Testing Tuesday: IFR Fuel Requirements

IFR Approach

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training: PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question – click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

IFR Approach

What are the minimum fuel requirements for airplanes in IFR conditions if the first airport of intended landing is forecast to have a 1,500-foot ceiling and 3 miles visibility at flight-planned ETA? Fuel to fly to the first airport of intended landing,

  1. and fly thereafter for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed.
  2. fly to the alternate, and fly thereafter for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed.
  3. fly to the alternate, and fly thereafter for 30 minutes at normal cruising speed.




Click here to display the answer…

I hope this Testing Tuesday question was helpful and thought-provoking, as usual! If you have any questions or concerns about this answer (or have a question that you would like to see on an upcoming Testing Tuesday post), contact us and let us know!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio. He wonders why his daughter’s diaper holds nowhere near the 12-18 pounds it promises.

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Testing Tuesday: Traffic Avoidance

Nav Lights

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training: PREPARATION! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in helping you live up to your side of learning to fly by being prepared when you meet with your flight instructor, saving you money and time! Good luck on the below question – click the link at the bottom to see the answer and explanation!

During a night flight, you observe a steady white light and a flashing red light ahead and at the same altitude. What is the general direction of movement of the other aircraft?

  1. The other aircraft is crossing from the right to the left.
  2. The other aircraft is flying away from you.
  3. The other aircraft is crossing from the left to the right.

Click here to display the answer…

As always, I hope this Testing Tuesday question was helpful and thought-provoking! If you have any questions or concerns about this answer (or have a question that you would like to see on an upcoming Testing Tuesday post), contact us and let us know!


Andrew Hartley is a certificated flight instructor and commercial pilot in Columbus, Ohio. He likes when google answers his stupid questions because it means he’s not the only one asking google stupid questions.

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Testing Tuesday: Airport Diagrams

FAA Figure 49

Each Tuesday, Smart Flight Training will post a sample question that a pilot could expect to see on an FAA Knowledge Test or hear during the oral portion of a checkride. A little known secret to saving money and time during your flight training: PREPARE! Hopefully Testing Tuesday post will be one small step in […]

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Learning to Fly vs. Learning to Drive

OHDL

I have a cousin (a cousin-in-law really) who has just gotten his learner’s permit for his driver’s license, and it got me thinking about the basic requirements to learn to drive and getting your driver’s license vs. learning to fly, and getting your Private Pilot Certificate. Let’s take a look, shall we? In the State […]

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Solo – A Blogging in Formation Post

Tailwheel airplane in flight

What does it mean to solo? 14 CFR Part 61.51(d): …a pilot may log as solo flight time only that flight time when the pilot is the sole occupant of the aircraft. Like all of the Federal Aviation Regulations, the above is an incredbly dry statement. It defines when you may log solo flight, which […]

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